Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Thanks...

...for all your supportive comments re: BHLDN and their well-known "design" practices. As a former law student, I do know that there's very little legal protection for clothing designers. I've studied the arguments on both sides regarding whether fashion design deserves such protection, and there's merit to both arguments (although I'm sure you can guess where I stand). I don't usually get in a lather over copying incidents--designers (like all creative people) draw inspiration from many sources, and that inspiration flows in all directions. What bothers me is a very studied practice of ripping off smaller designers' work as a business model. Consumers need to know that Anthro's cute "designs" come straight from uncredited, uncompensated sources. That's how they roll.

Besides being unethical and exploitive, it's just so boring! Way to take the creativity out of fashion. So I did that post. For that reason, and to show solidarity with my good friend Myra, who is wearing herself out trying to protect her work.

Luckily, we small designers have what big companies can never fake, no matter how they try--the urge to create for its own sake, the honest joy of new ideas.

4 comments:

Attempting to Save My Life said...

Well said and completely agree! It's a shame, but if nothing else, at least that old adage from elementary school could soothe you a bit - "copying is the sincerest form of flattery." It may not help, and it's still awful what they do, but perhaps it may make you smile.

Urban Weeds said...

Well said Elizabeth. I stand with you and Myra. There is an unspeakable amount of work you put into each creation.

That type of business model is truly disappointing. Copying is not flattering in my book. The company could easily pay for original content and create their own work.

I'm sorry this happened.

Kirby said...

that was put perfectly. keep up the great work and creative, new designs!

luis toledo : photographer said...

That's such a good point Elizabeth. I guess the larger fashion houses have accepted that they're going to be ripped off and its part of what drives them to try and innovate every season. Small and independent designers are really at a huge disadvantage when a big chain chooses to take (inspiration) from them. The likely result is that their advertising machine will get the design out and known far faster than the actual originator and by the time many clients see the designer's work, odds are they'll have been exposed to it already and it may not look fresh. There's even the distinct possibility that they'll think the small designer is ripping off the larger chain...